Adam T. Vaccaro

Occasional musings on journalism and media

Fun with Multimedia

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Over at SomervilleScout.com, I’ve been trying out some interactive storytelling methods. Both of these examples are a bit crude (and I’m not sure I was really all that interactive with this slideshow…I will need to try and work that out soon), but the exercises hopefully have some long-term value in helping me determine what does count as interactive. If I could do it again, I’d go more photos, a smaller text block, and a text block to go with each photo.

Meanwhile, I’ve enjoyed my first experience with Storify, here. However, I do sort of think all I’ve done here is provide a bunch of links and social media tidbits rather than tell a story. It’s almost like I’ve written something more akin to a PR piece than an actual story. Still, sometimes stories are like that. TEDxSomerville is a pretty exciting venture for the town; for a first experiment with Storify, maybe it’s best that I took on something that can be more of a build-it-up sort of story. The next Storify experiment would be to try something with some level of narrative or conflict; something that needs my voice to step in and mediate the discussion a bit more. Something that has more resemblance to, you know, an actual story.

I’m excited for my next experiment in multimedia. I’ll post it here when I have it.

Written by Adam T. Vaccaro

February 28, 2012 at 4:47 pm

Posted in My Work

Jesse Carlson and Berlin Patch: Hyperlocals and Pro and/or Big-Time Sports

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I don’t know a lot about Berlin Patch.

I’ve written and/or edited for its cousins in West Roxbury, Jamaica Plain, the South End, Falmouth, Newton, Norwood…I think there are a few more…over the last couple of years, but I can’t imagine I’d even visited Berlin, CT’s site until today.

Having just completed a hard day’s work, I headed over to my favorite source for sports news — Rotoworld — to learn about what’s gone on today at baseball’s winter meetings in Dallas. Only a little bit of Red Sox news awaited me — they signed Jessie Carlson to a split major/minor league contract. Nifty enough, I suppose. He’s had his injuries, but if they want Daniel Bard and Alfredo Aceves in the rotation, bullpen bodies are in demand.

What caught my eye was the source: you’ve got it, Berlin Patch. The site, which covers Berlin High School, Carlson’s alma mater, broke this news.

Again, I get it, in the grand world of Red Sox Internet-fandom, from Sons of Sam Horn to Boston Dirt Dogs, not that big of a big deal. Especially on the same day Albert Pujols became a quarter-billionaire.

But in the small town of Berlin, it probably is. Having broken the news, the story will probably get the links and clicks to keep it as the site’s most viewed page for a week or so (that’s just a guess; again, I don’t know much about the Berlin site). Carlson’s brother tipped Patch off.

Where else can hyperlocals get this kind of traffic from national sports stories? Obviously, they’re not in the best position to break major sports news, especially when it comes to free agency and trades, and even if they were, they need to justify their reporting it with a local twist. But what about if they have recruits at their local high school planning to go play for Penn State next year? Get on that. See if they’re still planning on heading into a post-Paterno Nittany Lions experience. For that matter, any local recruit headed to a major program really should be pushed on the site; some of these colleges have big-time followings (like the Red Sox have in New England) and will want to know about these guys. And if a major athlete makes an appearance in town, make sure you’re on it. If you can somehow score an interview at the autograph session, I think even talk about the team and their season is worth publishing, since it was said there, in town. If you get something remotely juicy, you also figure to get the traffic.

These are just a couple of thoughts from my end; feel free to pipe in with your own.

Written by Adam T. Vaccaro

December 8, 2011 at 5:38 pm